Leisure Jogging Associated With Lowest Mortality Risk!

 

The optimal frequency of jogging in terms of mortality risk was shown to be two to three times a week and at a leisurely pace, according to a study published Feb. 2 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC). Jogging three times or more a week was not shown to be statistically different from remaining sedentary.

 

Using data from the Copenhagen City Heart Study, researchers observed the pace, quality and frequency of jogging in 1,098 healthy joggers and 3,950 healthy non-joggers to evaluate the association between jogging and long-term, all-cause mortality. Participants were excluded for a history of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke and cancer. Participants rated their physical activity on a graded scale of one to four: one, almost entirely sedentary; two: light physical activity 2-4 hours per week; three: vigorous activity for 2-4 hours per week, or light physical activity for more than four hours per week; four: high vigorous physical activity for more than four hours. Joggers were further divided into three subgroups based on dose of jogging: slow (5 mph, 7 mph, >4 hours per week, >3 times per week).

Follow-up of all participants occurred from their first examination in 2001 until 2013, or death (a 12 year followup!).

The results of the study showed that jogging from 1 to 2.4 hours per week was associated with the lowest mortality, while greater quantities of jogging were not significantly different from remaining sedentary in terms of mortality risk. Further, researchers found a U-shaped association between jogging and mortality. Researchers reported 28 deaths among joggers and 128 among sedentary non-joggers, though no causes were recorded.

The authors conclude that “the U-shaped association suggests the existence of an upper limit for exercise dosing that is optimal for health benefits…If the goal is to decrease the risk of death and improve life expectancy, going for a leisurely job a few times per week at a moderate pace is a good strategy.”

In an accompanying editorial comment, Duck-chul Lee, PhD, Department of Kinesiology, College of Human Sciences, Iowa State University, adds that the study “adds to the current body of evidence on the dose-response relationship between running and mortality. However, further exploration is clearly warranted regarding whether there is an optimal amount of running for mortality benefits, especially for cardiovascular and CHD mortality. In addition, because self-reported doses of running may induce measurement error and bias, it would be preferable to use an objective assessment of doses of running in future studies.”

Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, MACC, editor-in-chief of JACC, remarks that “this study attempts to answer the question about whether increased intensity among better trained individuals results in improved outcomes. What is most interesting in this paper is the U-shaped curve of the findings, indicating that moderate exercise, with regard to total duration, frequency and intensity, results in the best benefit. Thus, it was fascinating to see that both the sedentary population and the aggressive exercisers (with regard to frequency, duration and speed) have higher mortality rates than the moderate exercisers.”

 

So, slow down a little if you are jogging too fast and too much! Soak in the surrounding and enjoy the jog at a leisurely pace!

 

 

via Study Shows Leisure Jogging Associated With Lowest Mortality Risk | ACC News Story – American College of Cardiology.

Run for 7 minutes daily to cut risk of heart attacks!

A simple seven-minute run has now been found to cut the risk of a heart attack or death due to stroke by 55%. 

Scientists confirm that running for only a few minutes a day or at slow speeds may significantly reduce a person’s risk of death from cardiovascular disease compared to someone who does not run. 

The US government and the World Health Organization recommend 75 minutes per week of vigorous-intensity activity, such as running but it was unclear whether there are health benefits for those exercising below this level. 

Researchers, therefore, studied 55,137 adults between the ages of 18 and 100 over a 15-year period to determine whether there is a relationship between running and longevity. 

Compared with non-runners, the runners had a 30% lower risk of death from all causes and a 45% lower risk of death from heart disease or stroke. 

Runners, on average, lived three years longer compared to non-runners. 

The authors have, therefore, concluded that promoting running is as important as preventing smoking, obesity or hypertension. 

The benefits were the same no matter how long, far, frequently or fast participants reported running. 

Benefits were also the same regardless of sex, age, body mass index, health conditions, smoking status or alcohol use. 



Running three times a week cut the chance of a fatal heart attack or stroke by 61% which was slightly more than those who ran once or twice a week. 

The optimum running speed was between 7.1mph and 7.6mph which cut the risk of a dying from a heart attack or stroke by 60%, the study found. 

Dr Chi Pang Wen of the Institute of Population Health Sciences in Taiwan said “A five-min run is as good as 15-min walk and a 25-min run can generate benefits that would require four times longer to accomplish by walking. As the researchers indicated, for younger individuals who are pressed for time, running is a far better option for time efficiency. Exercise is a miracle drug in many ways. The list of diseases that exercise can prevent, delay, modify progression of, or improve outcomes for is longer than we currently realise. We do not need to be athletes to exercise — it should be part of all of our daily routines.”
 
 
So, Get Going People!!!

 

 

Run for 7 minutes daily to cut risk of heart attacks, scientists say – The Times of India.

From Walking to Running!

Its necessary you read my earlier post: “Start Walking: How do I do it?”

In this post we will discuss about How to graduate from walking for 30 min to running for 30 minutes.

The American Heart Association recommends at least 30-45 minutes of exercise of moderate intensity. The goal is to increase your heart rate to at least 80% of your maximum heart rate (MHR). The MHR is calculated from the formula 220-age.

Exercises which will increase your heart rate are ones which are carried at moderate intensity. These include jogging, running, cycling, swimming and so forth.

After reading the article on  “Start Walking: How do I do it?”, I am taking for granted that you will be in a position to carry out brisk walking for 30 minutes at a stretch.

Precautions!

To run you need to do brisk walking without feeling breathless. This is necessary as going to running directly when one cannot walk could be dangerous. Running is to be avoided if you are extremely obese. Please don’t overtrain and injure yourself. During any stage of the exercise, if you feel any pain in your joints (especially the knees), its advisable to stop running. Seek medical advice if the pain persists.

Here are some general guidelines to graduate to Running:

1. Always start with some stretching exercises to relax your leg muscles.

2. Start walking at a comfortable pace for at least 10-15 minutes.

3. Now to proceed to running continuously for 30 minutes. This can be gradual and you need not rush into it. I would recommend the following to achieve this:

Lets break the 30 minutes into 5 minute intervals:

Weeks 1 and 2:  Run for 1 minute, Walk for 4 minutes, Repeat this for 30 minutes.

Weeks 3 and 4: Run for 2 minutes, Walk for 3 minutes, Repeat this for 30 minutes.

Weeks 5 and 6: Run for 3 minutes, Walk for 2 minutes, Repeat this for 30 minutes.

Weeks 7 and 8. Run for 4 minutes, Walk for 1 minute, Repeat this for 30 minutes.

Weeks 9 and 10: Run for 5 minutes, with no walk intervals, (one can still continue to have 30-60 seconds walking breaks if one wishes). That’s continuous running for 30 minutes! Congratulations! Sounds Easy!

Please remember: The 2 week options are not compulsory. One can continue with a particular week plan as long as you are comfortable (say for 4 weeks). You need to be comfortable and not have any injuries during the run. If you have any pain, stop running. Rest for few days till the pain goes away and continue only walking during that time.

So in just 10 weeks you will be able to go from  Walking to Running for 30 minutes a day!

4. The pace of running is entirely up to you. Do not sprint and invite injuries. Let it be very slow at the start. Maintain a pace wherein you are in a position to carry a conversation with a friend/ running partner comfortably without being out of breath. Slow running is better and can be continued through out life rather than fast running which may invite injuries and cause you to give it up.

5. Do a cool-down walk of 15 minutes following the run.

6. The important thing is to enjoy it! During any stage, if you feel tired or breathless, please go back to walking. Its also safer to consult your doctor if you have never exercised before.

Sounds Easy! I hope it helps! Running not only improves physical health but also give immense mental satisfaction and a sense of accomplishment. So Savour every moment of the run and the healthy lifestyle! Good Luck!

Walk, walk, walk!

Walk, walk, walk!

That’s the best advice I give to my patients.

Healthy lifestyle = healthy heart!

What’s the best exercise for the heart?

Its Aerobic exercise which the heart needs. Aerobic exercises increases the heart rate and thereby improve cardiac reserve.

Which are the Aerobic Exercises I can do?

Exercises which result in an increase in heart rate are good. These include:

Brisk Walking

Running/ Jogging

Cycling

Swimming

How does one know that the heart rate increases on a particular exercise?

One can feel his pulse or also feel the heart beats in the form of palpitations. Nowadays, one can buy a heart rate monitor which can be applied on the chest or on the arm.

Does slow walking help?

Yes it does help to a certain extent. However it may not result in good increase in heart rate if the pace of walking is slow.

How much should the heart rate increase to?

The heart rate should increase to a 80 to 85% of your maximum heart rate. One can calculate his maximum heart rate by the formula 220-age.

Maximum Heart Rate (MHR) = 220 – age of the individual

How long should this heart rate increase persist?

To derive maximum benefit, one should maintain the momentum of exercise for at least 15-20 minutes.

What health benefits does aerobic exercise offer?

Reduces BP

Reduces Cholesterol

Reduces sugar

Reduces weight

Reduces chances of heart attacks

Improves cardiac reserve

Improves mood

Improves joint mobility and reduces arthritis

Strengthens bones and joints

Increases ones confidence

Also, its doesn’t cost a thing!

Which is the best exercise?

Brisk walking happens to be the best as it can be done by individuals of all age groups. It can be done even if you are travelling out of town. It can be done any time of the day. and doesn’t cost a penny! Also its less stressful on the joints compared to running which can cause knee pain. If one has access to swimming pool, swimming is good for individuals with arthritis issues.

Whats the current recommendation for Exercise?

The American Heart Association recommends at least 30-45 minutes of exercise for all individuals for a minimum of 5 days in a week.

What about yoga?

Yoga/ Asanas are static postures and so do nothing to increase heart rate (and thereby the cardiac reserve). Pranayam and Yogasanas relaxes the body and mind and stretches the joints and muscles. Thereby, they provide a relaxing effect and reduce heart rate and blood pressure. They also help in reducing anxiety.

What about Surya-namaskars?

Surya-namaskars if done at a fast pace can increase heart rate and improve cardiac reserve. However for most of us its easier to go out walking than do surya-namaskars. Also the heart rate increase with surya-namaskars may not be to the extent as with other aerobic exercises.

What about mental health?

Relaxing techniques like pranayam, breathing techniques and even praying can relax one’s mind and provide much needed rest to the mind. Good sleep and adequate lesiure time is also necessary.