Sugar, Sugar, Sugar, Which is the sweetest dessert of them all!

We all love desserts! They give us a feeling of satiety and satisfaction which few things in this world provide. However, too much of indulgence can be harmful. Its better to be informed and make a choice about the dessert depending on its sugar content.

 

Here is a chart from Shari’s Berries showing the sugar content of different desserts.

 

As Julissa from Shari’s Berries mentions “Although most say “There is ALWAYS room for dessert”, there is no reason to go overboard on your sugar taste buds especially if you are watching your weight or want something lighter.

That’s why Shari’s Berries has created a visual chart with the most popular desserts you find at restaurants and parties. The desserts range from lowest to highest in sugar content, hopefully making your choice a little bit easier. Sweets are definitely fun but moderation is key!”

 

sweetest-desserts

http://www.berries.com/blog/sweetest-desserts

 

What works for weight loss? Data from the National Weight Control Registry

Some very interesting data revealed by the National Weight Loss Registry

A total of 2886 participants who had lost at least 30 pounds and kept it off for at least one year were enrolled.

Data was collected in 1993-2010 and analysis was conducted in 2012.

It was a 10 year observational study and recently got published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

FINDINGS OF THE REGISTRY!!!

  • The “average” woman is 45 years of age and currently weighs 145 lbs, while the “average” man is 49 years of age and currently weighs 190 lbs.
  • Registry members have lost an average of 66 lbs and kept it off for 5.5 years.
  • These averages, however, hide a lot of diversity:
      • Weight losses have ranged from 30 to 300 lbs.
      • Duration of successful weight loss has ranged from 1 year to 66 years!
      • Some have lost the weight rapidly, while others have lost weight very slowly–over as many as 14 years.
  • We have also started to learn about how the weight loss was accomplished: 45% of registry participants lost the weight on their own and the other 55% lost weight with the help of some type of program.
  • 98% of Registry participants report that they modified their food intake in some way to lose weight.
  • 94% increased their physical activity, with the most frequently reported form of activity being walking.
  • There is variety in how NWCR members keep the weight off. Most report continuing to maintain a low calorie, low fat diet and doing high levels of activity.

 

    • 78% eat breakfast every day.
    • 75% weigh themselves at least once a week.
    • 62% watch less than 10 hours of TV per week.
    • 90% exercise, on average, about 1 hour per day. 

 

CONCLUSIONS:

The majority of weight lost by NWCR members is maintained over 10 years. Long-term weight-loss maintenance is possible and requires sustained behavior change. 80% of persons in the registry are women and 20% are men.

 

Research Findings.

Which diet is best?

Obese and overweight people tend to struggle with weigh loss and so try out different types of diet after consulting their friends and relatives.

Some of these diets are successful while some fail miserably. Till now the conventional wisdom suggests that the best diets which work are low carbohydrate diets.

So, Which is the best diet?

An recent meta-analysis was published in the JAMA (Journal of American Medical Association) in sept 3, 2014 issue.  The authors studied 48 trials studying different types of diets. Diets were classified into Low-Fat and Low-Carbohydrate diets. Patients on Diets were compared to patients on no diet. The followup was done for a duration of 1 year.

Evidence showed that

1. Both low-carbohydrate and low-fat diets were associated with an estimated 8-kg weight loss at 6-month follow-up compared with no diet.

2. Approximately 1 to 2 kg of this effect was lost by 12-month follow-up. 

3. No specific diet was found to be superior over other diets.

All Diets Can Work, provided you adhere to them.

Before anyone switches to a new low-carb or low-fat diet, it is important to remember that all diets can work in the short run. However, most diets fail in the long run.

Sticking with a diet is far more important than the type of diet (low-carb or low-fat)!

Key to a long life is a waist measuring less than half your height!

The secret to a long life is having a waistline no larger than half your height, scientists claim.

A study by Cass Business School at City University in London, based on two decades of medical research, said a waist to height ratio of 80 per cent or more could reduce life expectancy by up to 20 years.

Dr Margaret Ashwell, who co-authored the study, said: “Keep your waist circumference to less than half your height.

“People are living in false hope if they rely on their BMI figure. We have got to measure the right thing.”

Unlike waist to height measurement, BMI does not distinguish between fat and muscle.

Dr Ashwell said the average 30-year-old, 5ft 10in tall man should have a waist of no more than 35in. This would put him in the healthy category.

If his waist expanded to 42in or 60 per cent of his height, he risked losing 1.7 years of life and if it increased to 56in he could die 20.2 years earlier.

An average 30-year-old, 5ft 4in tall woman risked dying 1.4 years earlier if she let her waist swell from half her height, 32in, to 60 per cent of her height, 38.4in.

If her waist increased to 51in, she could die 10.6 years earlier.

Children should be measured from the age of five to eliminate them from being at risk of obesity and associated health problems as adults, the study suggested.

Les Mayhew, a professor of statistics at Cass Business School, said: “There is now overwhelming evidence that government policy should place greater emphasis on waist to height ratio as a screening tool.”

Dr Ashwell, who popularised the discovery that apple-shaped obesity is more dangerous than pear-shaped, said BMI was particularly poor at measuring early death due to obesity in women.

The waist measurement method provided more accurate readings for both sexes.

via Key to a long life is a waist measuring less than half your height – Telegraph.

Guidelines for Treating Overweight and Obesity.

The recently released “2013 AHA/ACC/TOS Guideline for the Management of Overweight and Obesity in Adults” was created to reflect the latest research to outline best practices when it comes to treating obesity—a condition that affects more than one-third of American adults.

These guidelines help address questions like “What’s the best way to lose weight?” and “When is bariatric surgery appropriate?”.

Here is what every patient should know about the treatment of overweight and obesity:

Definition of obesity:

Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it can have an adverse effect on one’s health. Obesity can be diagnosed using body mass index (BMI), a measurement of height and weight, as well as waist circumference. Obesity is categorized as having a BMI of 30 or greater. Abdominal obesity is defined as having a waist circumference greater than 40 inches for a man or 35 inches for a woman.

Benefits of weight loss:

Obesity increases risk for serious conditions such as heart disease, diabetes and death, but losing just a little bit of weight can result in significant health benefits. For an adult who is obese, losing just 3–5% of body weight can improve blood pressure and cholesterol levels and reduce risk for heart disease and diabetes. Ideally, doctors recommend 5–10% weight loss for obese adults, which can produce even greater health benefits.

Weight loss strategies:

There is no single diet or weight loss program that works best for all patients. In general, reduced caloric intake and a comprehensive lifestyle intervention involving physical activity and behavior modification tailored according to a patient’s preferences and health status is most successful for sustained weight loss. Further, weight loss interventions should include frequent visits with health care providers and last more than one year for sustained weight loss.

Bariatric Surgery:

Bariatric surgery may be a good option for severely obese patients to reduce their risk of health complications and improve overall health. However, bariatric surgery should be reserved for only the highest risk patients until more evidence is available on this issue. Present guidelines advise that weight loss surgery is only recommended for patients with extreme obesity (BMI>40) or in patients that have a BMI>35, in addition to a chronic health condition.

 

via Guidelines for Treating Overweight and Obesity.

Latest ACC Guidelines for managing Overweight and Obesity

Latest ACC Guidelines for managing Overweight and Obesity

The ACC and American Heart Association Guideline for the Management of Overweight and Obese Adults addresses the appropriateness of the current BMI and waist circumference cut points used to determine risk in overweight and obese adults across diverse populations; the impact of weight loss on risk factors for CVD and type 2 diabetes; optimal behavioral and dietary intervention strategies; lifestyle treatment approaches, such as community-based programs, for weight loss and weight loss maintenance; and benefits and risks of various bariatric surgical procedures.

NYC’s Public-Health Policies Linked to Lower Cardiovascular Disease!

A decade of health policies and health-promotion messages in New York City aimed at preventing cardiovascular disease have pushed heart-disease rates downward faster than they have elsewhere in the US, according to the city’s health commissioner. “Making healthy choices easy ought to be our goal at the population level,” Dr Thomas Farley said during the opening ceremonies of the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress 2013.

Since 2002, when Mayor Michael Bloomberg took office and began implementing policies to battle smoking and obesity, the life expectancy of New Yorkers has risen by 36 months vs an average increase of 21.6 months in the rest of the country, Farley noted. Half of this increase was from decreased heart disease—probably the result of the ban on smoking in public places.

 

Encouraging Smoking Cessation

The city used a multipronged strategy to get its citizens to stop smoking. In 2002, it banned smoking in public places. Currently, it has the highest taxes on cigarettes in the country. When focus groups revealed that smokers were afraid of suffering but not of dying, they implemented a hard-hitting ad campaign that shows a patient with lung cancer “suffering every minute.”

The prevalence of smoking dropped from 21% in 2002 to 15.5% in 2012, “which represents about 300 000 fewer smokers . . . and saves an estimated 1500 lives a year,” Farley said.

Focusing on Diet, Calories, and Physical Fitness

Close to 60% of adults in New York City are overweight or obese—”a problem of normal people in an abnormal environment,” according to Farley.

To turn this around, the public-health department focused on increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables and making people aware of calories, sugary drinks, trans fat, and sodium.

The city established standards for food and beverage vending machines that deliver millions of meals and snacks to New York City government employees. It is also working with retailers to increase the prominence of healthy foods and set up a system of street vendors who sell only fruits and vegetables, in targeted neighborhoods.

In 2006, the New York Board of Health voted to restrict artificial transfat in 24000 restaurants, one of the first major cities to take this step. That initiative appears to have paid off. Then, in 2008, the city implemented a policy requiring that fast-food restaurants post the calorie content of foods. This resulted in a small but meaningful effect: 15% of consumers read the calorie content, and these individuals then eat 100 fewer calories.

The city has also led a successful campaign to lower the sodium content in food. Last year, 21 companies met voluntary sodium-reduction targets for such products as Heinz ketchup (15% lower) and Kraft singles American cheese (18% lower).

Public Policies to Prevent CVD

Speaking with heartwire after Farley’s presentation, CCC scientific program committee chair Dr Andrew Krahn (University of British Columbia, Vancouver) noted that the public-policy approaches undertaken in New York will be key to combating CVD.

 

via http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/812802