New Cholesterol Guidelines Abandon LDL Targets!

 

The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA), in conjunction with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), have developed and released Guidelines for Cholesterol Control after 9 years of the release of the last version. 

And they contain some substantial changes!

Gone are the recommended LDL- and non-HDL–cholesterol targets, specifically those that ask physicians to treat patients with cardiovascular disease to less than 100 mg/dL or the optional goal of less than 70 mg/dL.

According to the expert panel, there is simply no evidence from clinical trials to support treatment to a specific target. As a result, the new guidelines make no recommendations for specific LDL-cholesterol or non-HDL targets for the primary and secondary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

Instead, the new guidelines identify four groups of  patients in whom physicians should focus their efforts to reduce cardiovascular disease events. And in these four patient groups, the new guidelines make recommendations regarding the appropriate “intensity” of statin therapy in order to achieve relative reductions in LDL cholesterol.

 

The Four Major Statin Groups

The four major patient groups who should be treated with statins were identified on the basis of randomized, controlled clinical trials showing that the benefit of treatment outweighed the risk of adverse events. The four treatment groups include:

1. Individuals with clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

2. Individuals with LDL-cholesterol levels >190 mg/dL, such as those with familial hypercholesterolemia.

3. Individuals with diabetes aged 40 to 75 years old with LDL-cholesterol levels between 70 and 189 mg/dL and without evidence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

4. Individuals without evidence of cardiovascular disease or diabetes but who have LDL-cholesterol levels between 70 and 189 mg/dL and a 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease >7.5%.

 

In those with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, high-intensity statin therapy—such as rosuvastatin (Crestor, AstraZeneca) 20 to 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg—should be used to achieve at least a 50% reduction in LDL cholesterol unless otherwise contraindicated or when statin-associated adverse events are present. In other settings a  moderate reduction of LDL-cholesterol may be aimed for.

The guidelines advise not to aim to achieve a target value of LDL-cholesterol in these patients subsets but advice to start statins in moderate or high intensity to achieve significant reductions in LDL cholesterol from their baseline levels.

 

via New Cholesterol Guidelines Abandon LDL Targets.

What should be your Ideal Cholesterol?

What are the types of Fats in our body?

The human body contains different types of fats or lipids. Lipids are important chemicals present in the body and needed for various cellular functions. The fats in our body are of different types. They can simply be divided in Bad and Good fats.

Which are the Bad fats/ lipids? How do they harm us?

The Bad fats get deposited in our arteries thereby causing blocks. These blocks decrease the blood supply of the organs causing various serious illnesses like heart attacks (decrease blood supply to the brain), paralytic strokes (decrease blood supply to the brain), or gangrene of the limbs (decrease blood supply to the limbs). Thus it is important to keep our Bad cholesterol below the normal range.  There are 2 types of Bad Cholesterol in our body: LDL Cholesterol and Triglycerides. Higher levels of Bad Cholesterol can be harmful in the long run.

Which are the Good fats/ lipids? Do they harm us?

The Good Cholesterol is protective and higher levels are better. The Good Cholesterol in our body is HDL Cholesterol.

How do we know our fat/lipid level?

One needs to do a Complete lipid profile (blood test) after 12 hours of fasting.

What should be your LDL (Bad) Cholesterol level?

If one suffers from any of the below mentioned illnesses, then the LDL Cholesterol needs to be below 100 mg/dl. These disorders are

  1. Diabetes
  2. Heart attacks 
  3. Blocks in your coronary artery causing angina (chest pain)
  4. Undergone angioplasty or bypass surgery
  5. Renal failure
  6. Blocks in any of your arteries: carotid artery or peripheral arteries
  7. Dilatation of your aorta.

 

Does diet and exercise help to reduce Bad Cholesterol?

Yes, they do. Brisk walking every day for 30-45 minutes can help reduce your bad cholesterol and increase your good cholesterol. Avoiding foods rich in fats like fried food, cakes, sweets can also help reduce the bad cholesterol.

 

Are there medicines which reduce Bad Cholesterol and prevent heart attacks?

Statins are called the wonder drugs which reduce LDL cholesterol. These drugs are extremely safe and also decrease triglyceride levels and increase the good cholesterol! They have been proven to prevent heart attacks and in some cases reduce the blocks! These drugs need to be taken on a daily basis and need to be continued lifelong.

Cholesterol, fats, lipids! what are they and what should be their levels?

What are the types of Fats in our body?

The human body contains different types of fats or lipids. Lipids are important chemicals present in the body and needed for various cellular functions. The fats in our body are of different types. They can simply be divided in Bad and Good fats.

Which are the Bad fats/ lipids? How do they harm us?

The Bad fats get deposited in our arteries thereby causing blocks. These blocks decrease the blood supply of the organs causing various serious illnesses like heart attacks (decrease blood supply to the brain), paralytic strokes (decrease blood supply to the brain), or gangrene of the limbs (decrease blood supply to the limbs). Thus it is important to keep our Bad cholesterol below the normal range.  There are 2 types of Bad Cholesterol in our body: LDL Cholesterol and Triglycerides. Higher levels of Bad Cholesterol can be harmful in the long run.

Which are the Good fats/ lipids? Do they harm us?

The Good Cholesterol is protective and higher levels are better. The Good Cholesterol in our body is HDL Cholesterol.

How do we know our fat/lipid level?

One needs to do a Complete lipid profile (blood test) after 12 hours of fasting.

What should be your LDL (Bad) Cholesterol level?

If one suffers from any of the below mentioned illnesses, then the LDL Cholesterol needs to be below 100 mg/dl. These disorders are

  1. Diabetes
  2. Heart attacks
  3. Blocks in your coronary artery causing angina (chest pain)
  4. Undergone angioplasty or bypass surgery
  5. Renal failure
  6. Blocks in any of your arteries: carotid artery or peripheral arteries
  7. dilatation of your aorta.

Does diet and exercise help to reduce Bad Cholesterol?

Yes, they do. Brisk walking every day for 30-45 minutes can help reduce your bad cholesterol and increase your good cholesterol. Avoiding foods rich in fats like fried food, cakes, sweets can also help reduce the bad cholesterol.

Are there medicines which reduce Bad Cholesterol and prevent heart attacks?

Statins are called the wonder drugs which reduce LDL cholesterol. These drugs are extremely safe and also decrease triglyceride levels and increase the good cholesterol! They have been proven to prevent heart attacks and in some cases reduce the blocks! These drugs need to be taken on a daily basis and need to be continued lifelong.