ESH/ESC publish hypertension guidelines: Lifestyle changes reduce BP!

The European Society of Cardiology and the European Society of Hypertension released Guidelines for Physicians to treat Hypertension (high BP). The joint guidelines are designed to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with hypertension.

Worldwide, 1.5 billion people currently have high blood pressure, according to the World Health Organization.

Dr Robert Fagard, the chair of the ESH/ESC writing committee, reiterated that treatment decisions for patients should be dictated by their overall level of risk and a holistic approach to treatment should be advised by physicians.

 

Lifestyle changes for treatment!.

 

The new guidelines make a host of lifestyle recommendations for lowering blood pressure.

1. Salt intake:  The Guidelines recommend salt intake of approximately 5 to 6 g per day, in contrast with a typical intake of 9 to 12 g per day. A reduction to 5 g per day can decrease systolic blood pressure about 1 to 2 mm Hg in normotensive individuals and 4 to 5 mm Hg in hypertensive patients.

2. Lower BMI:  While the optimal body-mass index (BMI) is not known, the guidelines recommend getting BMIs down to 25 kg/m2 and reducing waist circumferences to <102 cm in men and <88 cm in women. Losing about 5 kg can reduce systolic blood pressure by as much as 4 mm Hg.

3. Exercise: Aerobic endurance training in hypertensive patients can reduce systolic blood pressure by 7 mm Hg.

 

Fagard said that physicians can typically give low/moderate-risk individuals a few months with lifestyle changes to determine whether they’re having an impact on blood pressure. They should be more aggressive with higher-risk patients, however, noting that drug therapy is started typically within a few weeks if diet and exercise are ineffective.

 

via ESH/ESC publish hypertension guidelines | theheart.org.

How not to get High blood pressure (Hypertension)!

Individuals detected to have mildly elevated blood pressure may be able to maintain normal blood pressure for the next 15 years without any medications!

That’s what the HARVEST trial says. The data was presented at the 2013 International Conference on Prehypertension and Cardiometabolic Syndrome.

Young adults (1012 in number with a mean age of 33 years) were diagnosed with mildly elevated blood pressure (grade 1 hypertension). They were followed up for the next 15 years.

It was observed that  in 198 patients, the blood pressure fell to within normal range within the first few months and they managed to remain normotensive (normal blood pressure) over next 15 years.

The patients whose blood pressure fell and remained normal had a  slightly lower body-mass index (BMI), lower coffee consumption, lower triglycerides, and higher physical-activity levels than the ones in whom the blood pressure remained higher!

Again a trial highlighting the importance of body weight and exercise to avoid diseases like diabetes and blood pressure.

Fifteen years later, hypertension free!

That’s great! Isn’t it? So start walking and eat healthy!

via Remaining normotensive: Insights from HARVEST | theheart.org.