Debunking Nutrition Myths by American College of Cardiology

 

 

Dated 27th Feb 2017, the ACC (American College of Cardiology) published a review article on Debunking nutritional myths.

The article supports eating plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts in moderation. It also mentions that very limited quantities of lean meat, fish, low-fat and nonfat dairy products and liquid vegetable oils may be consumed. It however does not recommend intake of antioxidant pills, juicing and gluten-free diets (unless allergic to gluten).

A summary is provided:

Eggs and cholesterol:

Although a U.S. government report issued in 2015 dropped specific recommendations about upper limits for cholesterol consumption, the review concludes, “it remains prudent to advise patients to significantly limit intake of dietary cholesterol in the form of eggs or any high cholesterol foods to as little as possible.”

Vegetable oils:

According to the authors, coconut oil and palm oil should be discouraged due to limited data supporting routine use. The most heart-healthy oil is olive oil, though perhaps in moderation as it is still higher calorie, research suggests.

Berries and antioxidant supplementation:

Fruits and vegetables are the healthiest and most beneficial source of antioxidants to reduce heart disease risk, the review explains. There is no compelling evidence adding high-dose antioxidant dietary supplements benefits heart health.

Nuts:

Nuts can be part of a heart-healthy diet. But beware of consuming too many, because nuts are high in calories, said the authors.

Juicing:

The authors explain that while the fruits and vegetables contained in juices are heart-healthy, the process of juicing concentrates calories, which makes it is much easier to ingest too many. Eating whole fruits and vegetables is preferred, with juicing primarily reserved for situations when daily intake of vegetables and fruits is inadequate. If you do juice, avoid adding extra sugar by putting in honey, to minimize calories.

Gluten:

People who have celiac disease or other gluten sensitivity must avoid gluten – wheat, barley and rye. For patients who don’t have any gluten sensitivities, many of the claims for health benefits of a gluten-free diet are unsubstantiated.

 

Source: ACC Prevention Council Perspective Aims to Debunk Nutrition Myths – American College of Cardiology

NYC’s Public-Health Policies Linked to Lower Cardiovascular Disease!

A decade of health policies and health-promotion messages in New York City aimed at preventing cardiovascular disease have pushed heart-disease rates downward faster than they have elsewhere in the US, according to the city’s health commissioner. “Making healthy choices easy ought to be our goal at the population level,” Dr Thomas Farley said during the opening ceremonies of the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress 2013.

Since 2002, when Mayor Michael Bloomberg took office and began implementing policies to battle smoking and obesity, the life expectancy of New Yorkers has risen by 36 months vs an average increase of 21.6 months in the rest of the country, Farley noted. Half of this increase was from decreased heart disease—probably the result of the ban on smoking in public places.

 

Encouraging Smoking Cessation

The city used a multipronged strategy to get its citizens to stop smoking. In 2002, it banned smoking in public places. Currently, it has the highest taxes on cigarettes in the country. When focus groups revealed that smokers were afraid of suffering but not of dying, they implemented a hard-hitting ad campaign that shows a patient with lung cancer “suffering every minute.”

The prevalence of smoking dropped from 21% in 2002 to 15.5% in 2012, “which represents about 300 000 fewer smokers . . . and saves an estimated 1500 lives a year,” Farley said.

Focusing on Diet, Calories, and Physical Fitness

Close to 60% of adults in New York City are overweight or obese—”a problem of normal people in an abnormal environment,” according to Farley.

To turn this around, the public-health department focused on increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables and making people aware of calories, sugary drinks, trans fat, and sodium.

The city established standards for food and beverage vending machines that deliver millions of meals and snacks to New York City government employees. It is also working with retailers to increase the prominence of healthy foods and set up a system of street vendors who sell only fruits and vegetables, in targeted neighborhoods.

In 2006, the New York Board of Health voted to restrict artificial transfat in 24000 restaurants, one of the first major cities to take this step. That initiative appears to have paid off. Then, in 2008, the city implemented a policy requiring that fast-food restaurants post the calorie content of foods. This resulted in a small but meaningful effect: 15% of consumers read the calorie content, and these individuals then eat 100 fewer calories.

The city has also led a successful campaign to lower the sodium content in food. Last year, 21 companies met voluntary sodium-reduction targets for such products as Heinz ketchup (15% lower) and Kraft singles American cheese (18% lower).

Public Policies to Prevent CVD

Speaking with heartwire after Farley’s presentation, CCC scientific program committee chair Dr Andrew Krahn (University of British Columbia, Vancouver) noted that the public-policy approaches undertaken in New York will be key to combating CVD.

 

via http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/812802

Unprocessed fatty foods may actually be good for you!

Four decades of medical wisdom that cutting down on saturated fats reduces our risk of heart disease may be wrong, a top cardiologist has said. Fatty foods that have not been processed – such as butter, cheese, eggs and yoghurt – can even be good for the heart, and repeated advice that we should cut our fat intake may have actually increased risks of heart disease, said Dr Aseem Malhotra.

Writing in the British Medical Journal, he argues that saturated fats have been “demonised” since a major study in 1970 linked increased levels of heart disease with high cholesterol and high saturated fat intake.

The NHS currently recommends that the average man should eat no more than 30g of saturated fat a day and women no more than 20g. However, Dr Malhotra, a specialist at Croydon University Hospital, said that cutting sugar out of our diets should be a far greater priority.

He told The Independent: “From the analysis of the independent evidence that I have done, saturated fat from non-processed food is not harmful and probably beneficial. Butter, cheese, yoghurt and eggs are generally healthy and not detrimental. The food industry has profited from the low-fat mantra for decades because foods that are marketed as low-fat are often loaded with sugar. We are now learning that added sugar in food is driving the obesity epidemic and the rise in diabetes and cardiovascular disease.”

A recent study indicated that 75 per cent of acute heart attack patients have normal cholesterol concentrations, suggesting that cholesterol levels are not the real problem, Dr Malhotra argued.

He also pointed to figures suggesting the amount of fat consumed in the US has gone down in the past 30 years while obesity rates have risen.

Bad diet advice has also led to millions of patients being prescribed statins to control their blood pressure, he argues, when simply adopting a Mediterranean diet might be more effective.

 

via Top heart doctor: Unprocessed fatty foods may actually be good for you – Health News – Health & Families – The Independent.