Dietary Guidelines 2015-2020 summary

 

Guidelines (Abbreviated)

  • Follow a healthy eating pattern across the life span.
  • Focus on variety, nutrient density, and amount.
  • Limit calories from added sugars and saturated fats and reduce sodium intake.
  • Shift to healthier food and beverage choices.
  • Support healthy eating patterns for all.

 

Key Recommendations
Follow a healthy eating pattern that accounts for all foods and beverages within an appropriate calorie level.       A healthy eating pattern includes

A variety of vegetables from all of the subgroups—dark green, red and orange, legumes (beans and peas), starchy, and other

Fruits, especially whole fruits

Grains, at least half of which are whole grains

Fat-free or low-fat dairy, including milk, yogurt, cheese, and fortified soy beverages

A variety of protein foods, including seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, legumes (beans and peas), and nuts, seeds, and soy products

Oils

A healthy eating pattern limits saturated fats and trans fats, added sugars, and sodium.

 

Key recommendations that are quantitative are provided for several components of the diet of particular public health concern that should be limited.

Consume less than 10% of calories per day from added sugars.

Consume less than 10% of calories per day from saturated fats.

Consume less than 2300 mg/d of sodium.

If alcohol is consumed, it should be consumed in moderation—up to 1 drink per day for women and up to 2 drinks per day for men—and only by adults of legal drinking age.

 

The Dietary Guidelines also include a key recommendation to meet the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.

 

 

 

 

This Viewpoint summarizes the updated recommendations of the US Department of Health and Human Services’ recently released 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Source: JAMA Network | JAMA | Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Which diet is best?

Obese and overweight people tend to struggle with weigh loss and so try out different types of diet after consulting their friends and relatives.

Some of these diets are successful while some fail miserably. Till now the conventional wisdom suggests that the best diets which work are low carbohydrate diets.

So, Which is the best diet?

An recent meta-analysis was published in the JAMA (Journal of American Medical Association) in sept 3, 2014 issue.  The authors studied 48 trials studying different types of diets. Diets were classified into Low-Fat and Low-Carbohydrate diets. Patients on Diets were compared to patients on no diet. The followup was done for a duration of 1 year.

Evidence showed that

1. Both low-carbohydrate and low-fat diets were associated with an estimated 8-kg weight loss at 6-month follow-up compared with no diet.

2. Approximately 1 to 2 kg of this effect was lost by 12-month follow-up. 

3. No specific diet was found to be superior over other diets.

All Diets Can Work, provided you adhere to them.

Before anyone switches to a new low-carb or low-fat diet, it is important to remember that all diets can work in the short run. However, most diets fail in the long run.

Sticking with a diet is far more important than the type of diet (low-carb or low-fat)!

Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts, olive oil and 7 glasses of wine a week! prevents heart disease and stroke!

This is the largest randomized trial to date. The Mediterranean diet has been studied previously in randomized trials but not in a trial as large as this!

It is fascinating that this was a study of more than 7400 individuals who were randomly assigned to 3 different diets. Two were Mediterranean diets enriched with either extra-virgin olive oil or nuts and other Mediterranean foods, both including more than 7 glasses of wine per week. The control diet was a low-fat diet, which some people have argued is not an ideal control. There was very good compliance with the diets in this large number of people for many years. The primary endpoint was death, heart attack, or stroke. There was a very important significant reduction of this cluster endpoint in the Mediterranean diet groups. Particularly noteworthy, even by itself, was the reduction in stroke.

So what does the Mediterranean diet consists of?

The Mediterranean diet is a modern nutritional recommendation inspired by the traditional dietary patterns of southern Italy, Greece and Spain. The principal aspects of this diet include proportionally high consumption of olive oil, legumes, unrefined cereals, fruits and vegetables, moderate to high consumption of fish, moderate consumption of dairy products (mostly as cheese and yogurt), moderate wine consumption, and low consumption of meat and meat products. (Source: from Wikipedia).

So go on!

Fruits, veggies, legumes,

7 glasses of wine a week,

nuts,

salads with olive oil dressing

should do the trick!

via Topol: ‘Evidence Is Compelling’ on Mediterranean Diet.