New Guidelines on Cholesterol management released!

American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) released new Guidelines on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol last week.

The biggest change in the new guidelines is : “there is no target level of cholesterol to be achieved by the drugs.”  Lower levels of cholesterol are better but no particular level is found to be protective. So, the following are no longer considered appropriate strategies: treat to target, lower is best, treat to level of cardiovascular disease risk, and based upon lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease. 


Through a rigorous process, four groups of individuals were identified, who would benefit the most with anti-cholesterol drugs called Statins.

Four Statin Benefit Groups: 

• 1) Individuals with clinical atherosclerotic disease: coronary artery disease, stroke, or any vascular disease.

• 2) Individuals with elevations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) ≥190 mg/dl. 

• 3) Individuals 40-75 years of age with diabetes, and LDL-C > 70 mg/dl.

• 4) Individuals who have an estimated 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk of 7.5% or higher. 

Individuals in the fourth group can be identified by using the new Pooled Cohort Equations for ASCVD risk prediction, developed by the Risk Assessment Work Group. The 10 year- Cardiovascular Risk Calculator can be calculated by entering your values in the calculator which can be downloaded from the below mentioned site.

http://my.americanheart.org/professional/StatementsGuidelines/PreventionGuidelines/Prevention-Guidelines_UCM_457698_SubHomePage.jsp

The dose of statin advised is either high or moderate in order to reduce LDL cholesterol level by > 50% and 30-50% respectively

Lifestyle modification (i.e., adhering to a heart healthy diet, regular exercise habits, avoidance of tobacco products, and maintenance of a healthy weight) remains a critical component of health promotion and ASCVD risk reduction, both prior to and in concert with the use of cholesterol-lowering drug therapies. 



CardioSource – 2013 ACC AHA Guideline on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol.

5 Ways to Prevent Death in Middle Age!

“Death in old age is, of course, inevitable, but death in middle age is not”, so rightly said by Dr. Kerr.

 

Professor Peter Elwood, who is at the School of Public Health at the University of Wales in Cardiff, has done a remarkable piece of work observing a large cohort of Welsh men for over 30 years. By carefully monitoring patterns of behavior — smoking, alcohol consumption, and so on — he has mapped these behaviors onto the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, diabetes, dementia, and, of course, cancer. He showed that if we live well, if we choose to live well, then we can have remarkable reductions in the risk of developing all those types of diseases.

The 5 Longevity “Virtues”

There are 5 basic types of good behavior: regular exercise, not smoking, alcohol consumption within guidelines, maintaining a low BMI (body mass index), and eating a predominantly plant-based diet.

Thus, if one practices 4 or 5 of those “virtues,” compared with men who practice none, the reduction in the risk for cardiovascular disease is around 67%; the reduction in the incidence of diabetes is 73%; the reduction in developing cancer is 20%-25%; remarkably, the reduction in dementia is 65%; and the reduction in all-cause mortality is 32%. Most of the reduction in cancer risk was related to smoking, and frankly the other forms of behavior in this cohort did not affect the development of cancer very remarkably.

 

Very similar outcomes have been found in large studies in the United States and elsewhere in Western Europe.

Many deaths in middle age are preventable. Let us live well. and Live Long!

 

 5 Ways to Prevent Death in Middle Age.