Prevent Heart Failure.

The best way to prevent heart failure is to:

Lower your risk of getting heart disease by making lifestyle changes.

Control certain health problems, such as high blood pressure and diabetes.

 

To reduce your risk:

 

Don’t smoke. If you smoke, quit. Smoking greatly increases your risk for heart disease. Avoid secondhand smoke too.

Lower your cholesterol. If you have high cholesterol, follow your doctor’s advice for lowering it. Eating a heart-healthy diet-such as the TLC diet -exercising, and quitting smoking will help keep your cholesterol low.

Control your blood pressure. High blood pressure raises your risk of getting heart disease and heart failure. Exercising, limiting alcohol, and controlling stress will help keep your blood pressure in a healthy range.

Get regular exercise. Exercise will help control your weight, blood pressure, and stress. Controlling these things will help keep your heart healthy. Try to do activities that raise your heart rate. Aim for at least 2½ hours of moderate exercise a week. One way to do this is to be active at least 10 minutes 3 times a day, 5 days a week. Talk to your doctor before starting an exercise program.

Control diabetes. Take your medicines as directed, and work with your doctor to make a diet and exercise plan to control diabetes.

Limit alcohol. If you drink alcohol, drink moderately. This means no more than 2 drinks a day for men and 1 drink a day for women. Heavy consumption of alcohol can lead to heart failure.

 

via Heart Failure-Prevention.

September is Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) Awareness month!

Atrial Fibrillation — also known as AFib or AF — is the most common arrhythmia. It affects more than 2.5 million American adults and 4.5 million people living in the European Union, and accounts for approximately one-third of hospitalizations for cardiac rhythm disturbances.

It is characterized by a rapid and irregular heartbeat caused when the top chambers of the heart (the atria) quiver (fibrillate) erratically, sometimes faster than 200 times per minute. The condition can have a significant negative impact on an individual’s quality of life, causing heart palpitations, chronic fatigue, and debilitating pain.

AFib can also increase the risk of stroke fivefold. It is estimated to be responsible for 88,000 deaths and $16 billion in additional costs to the U.S. healthcare system. As the world population ages, the prevalence of AFib is projected to increase. In fact, in the next 30-40 years, the number of people in diagnosed with AFib in the U.S. is expected to more than double.

The Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), through its efforts during Atrial Fibrillation Awareness Month in September and throughout the year, is working to increase public knowledge of AFib, including its symptoms, warning signs, and available treatment options.

via Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) Awareness.