Prevent cancer by being fit!

Being Fit Can Protect Against Developing, Dying of Cancer!

Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) appears to be a strong independent predictor of not only developing 2 common cancers, but also the prognosis.

The risk of developing both lung and colorectal cancer were decreased by 68% and 38%, respectively, in men with the highest levels of fitness, as compared with those who were the least fit, according to a new study.

A high level of fitness was also associated with a 14% reduction in cancer-specific mortality, and a 23% reduction in cardiovascular-specific mortality.

 

Dr. Lakoski presented the findings of her research at a press briefing held in advance of the 2013 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology® (ASCO).

 

The cohort included 17,049 men (mean age, 50 years) who had received a single cardiovascular fitness assessment as part of a specialized preventive health check-up visit that was offered at the Cooper Institute, in Dallas, Texas. Performance was recorded in established units of fitness called metabolic equivalents (METs). The participants were then separated into 5 quintiles according to their fitness performance.

Medicare claims were then subsequently analyzed to identify the participants who had developed lung, colorectal, or prostate cancer. The mean times from their initial CRF assessment to cancer incidence and death were 20.2 ± 8.2 years and 24.4 ± 8.5 years, respectively. During this time period, a total of 2885 men were diagnosed with prostate, lung, or colorectal cancer (2332 with prostate cancer, 276 with colorectal cancer, and 277 with lung cancer).

Within the study period, a total of 769 men died of all-cause mortality, with 347 of those deaths due to cancer, and 159 to cardiovascular disease.

 

Compared with men in the lowest CRF quintile, the adjusted hazard ratio for lung and colorectal cancer incidence among men in the highest CRF quintile was 0.32 and 0.62 respectively.

Even a small improvement in fitness levels (1-MET increase in CRF) was associated with a 14% reduction in cancer-specific mortality.

Everyone Can Benefit!

The study authors also found that that even if the men weren’t obese, those who had low fitness had an increased risk for cancer and cardiovascular disease.

“This suggests that everyone can benefit from improving their fitness,” said Dr. Swain, who served as a comoderator of the briefing.

 

via Being Fit Can Protect Against Developing, Dying of Cancer.

AMA Declares Obesity a Disease!

 

Physicians voted overwhelmingly to label obesity as a disease that requires a range of interventions to advance treatment and prevention.

However, there was impassioned debate in the hours before the vote at the American Medical Association (AMA) 2013 Annual Meeting.

The physicians in favor of classifying obesity as a disease  explained. “Obesity is a pathophysiologic disease. There is a treatment for this disease; it involves behavioral modifications, medications, and surgeons.” said Jonathan Leffert, MD, alternate delegate for Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism. “The scientific evidence is overwhelming.

However, all are not convinced. Some say that obesity does not meet the criteria for disease.

Russell Kridel, MD, incoming chair of the AMA Council on Science and Public Health (CSPH), feels that there is no debate about the importance and urgency of addressing the problem, but he doesn’t believe it qualifies as a disease. “It’s more like smoking. Smoking isn’t a disease. Smoking can cause disease such as lung cancer and emphysema in the same way that obesity can lead to diabetes and hypertension,” he explained. “We’re really talking nomenclature here, not philosophy.”

Some feel that since body mass index, an imperfect measure, is used to determine obesity, people who are otherwise healthy are being diagnosed as obese.

“Why should one third of Americans be diagnosed as having a disease if they aren’t necessarily sick?” they ask.

One Third of Americans!

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 35.7% of Americans are obese. Obesity-related conditions, including heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and certain cancers, are some of the leading causes of preventable death.

Take a poll on what you feel!

 

 

via AMA Declares Obesity a Disease.

Tea and Coffee Lower Blood Pressure!

Are you addicted to tea or coffee?

A large French retrospective analysis provides good news for caffeine lovers: investigators showed that drinking tea or coffee was associated with a small statistically significant reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

Drinking tea and coffee was also associated with a significant reduction in pulse pressure and heart rate, although the heart-rate reductions were greater with tea.

The results of this data were presented at the recently held European Society of Hypertension ESH 2013 Scientific Sessions, at Paris, France.

Presenting the data on 176 437 subjects aged 16 to 95 years of age who had a checkup at their center between 2001 and 2011, the authors explained that the analysis was based on a questionnaire asking participants how much coffee or tea they drank per day. Individuals were classified into three groups: those who drank no coffee/tea, those who drank one to four cups, and those who drank more than four cups.

Overall, coffee is consumed more frequently than tea.  Men were more likely to drink coffee, while women were more commonly tea drinkers.

Both coffee and tea consumption was associated with a significant reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

So go ahead. Grab your cuppa!

via Tea and Coffee Lower Blood Pressure.